Want to know what our High School TAB (that’s our book club) readers are saying this month?? They are never shy about their opinions and they always have some great recommendations for your TBR (to be read) pile.
Check out our monthly meeting notes here!

Want to know what our High School TAB (that’s our book club) readers are saying this month?? They are never shy about their opinions and they always have some great recommendations for your TBR (to be read) pile.

Check out our monthly meeting notes here!


READING LIVES, Episode #2 - BOOK RIOT

weneeddiversebooks:

Lots of diverse books are discussed when acclaimed author & WNDB team member Meg Medina discussing Reading Lives on Book Riot.

Don’t forget, she’ll be at Central Library on October 27!

Katie has the perfect book for reading and then planning an expedition… 

An Age of License: A Travelogue by Lucy KnisleyAlready missing summer vacation? Looking for a means by which to travel the world in an afternoon? Lucy Knisley is here to help. She’s ready to take you on an adventure from Norway to Sweden to Germany to France, all for the price of a library card. So get ready. This graphic novel is a gorgeous, exciting European vacation on the cheap.But like all good books and travelogues, it’s not all stunning old cities, delicious food, and romance with foreign boys (although there is plenty of all of the above, too). It’s really an exploration of being young and privileged enough to travel and what exactly that means. Lucy Knisley offers a window into that tricky time in life where you can’t help but think about the Future, but it hasn’t seemed to quite have arrived yet. The time when you aren’t in school but not quite settled into a career, when you are figuring out what you want from relationships long term, when you are seeing where and how other people live and trying it all on for size. In other words, Lucy let’s us travel along with her during her age of license. And it’s a beautiful, funny, insightful journey.Whether you pick An Age of License up for the kissing or for the blowgun lessons, it’s the deeper ideas that are explored that will stay with you long after the final page is turned. 
More to read:
Relish by Lucy Knisley  
What I Would Have Read: Travel Stories
From the Archives: One to Send Libby on her Way
Radio Week: Jonsi - Gathering Stories
Postcard Friday: Mysterious Prague
Post Card Friday: Travel to Central America with 2 Up and Coming Titles!
Katie has the perfect book for reading and then planning an expedition…
An Age of License: A Travelogue by Lucy Knisley

Already missing summer vacation? Looking for a means by which to travel the world in an afternoon? Lucy Knisley is here to help. She’s ready to take you on an adventure from Norway to Sweden to Germany to France, all for the price of a library card. So get ready. This graphic novel is a gorgeous, exciting European vacation on the cheap.

But like all good books and travelogues, it’s not all stunning old cities, delicious food, and romance with foreign boys (although there is plenty of all of the above, too). It’s really an exploration of being young and privileged enough to travel and what exactly that means. Lucy Knisley offers a window into that tricky time in life where you can’t help but think about the Future, but it hasn’t seemed to quite have arrived yet. The time when you aren’t in school but not quite settled into a career, when you are figuring out what you want from relationships long term, when you are seeing where and how other people live and trying it all on for size. In other words, Lucy let’s us travel along with her during her age of license. And it’s a beautiful, funny, insightful journey.

Whether you pick An Age of License up for the kissing or for the blowgun lessons, it’s the deeper ideas that are explored that will stay with you long after the final page is turned.


More to read:

Relish by Lucy Knisley  

What I Would Have Read: Travel Stories

From the Archives: One to Send Libby on her Way

Radio Week: Jonsi - Gathering Stories

Postcard Friday: Mysterious Prague

Post Card Friday: Travel to Central America with 2 Up and Coming Titles!


We are so thrilled to bring you an interview with Trish Doller, the amazing author of Something Like Normal and Where the Stars Still Shine. Check out our behind the scenes look and then go check out those books!


Your two books have very different narrators both with distinct voices. One is a Marine, just barely off the plane home and one is a ferociously independent teen girl dealing with major changes in who she considers family.  How did you decide on those voices? Was it easier to get in Callie’s or Travis’ head? 


Something Like Normal was initially meant to be from the perspective of a girl like Harper, who had been wronged by Travis and spent most of her high school years as an outcast. Travis was supposed to come home from war damaged and understanding how it feels to be an outcast. Except I realized his story was far more compelling, so I let him tell it. 


In Where the StarsStill Shine, I knew Callie’s story would take place in Tarpon Springs—that was the first piece of the story—and I knew she would be returning to a family she didn’t remember, but it took some listening before I figured out that her mother had abducted her.


Callie’s character keeps so much to herself, and I found that it took me a lot more work to get to the heart of her story. Travis, on the other hand, was very forthcoming and it was much easier to be in his head.



There is a very strong family and community in WTSSS. Callie’s dad’s family is Greek and comes from a town where everyone knows everything about each other. Was it fun to write a big family? Are you from one? 


Callie’s big fat Greek family is probably my favorite part of her story. I love writing little kids and old people and parents, so it was incredibly fun writing all of them. When I was growing up, my immediate family was just my mom and me, but I have 19 cousins with whom I spent so much time that it was like being part of a big family. And I drew a lot on the family reunion experience because I think no matter what your ethnicity, every family has bossy old ladies, gossips, and at least one aunt who leaves angry, taking her Tupperware with her.


There are some seriously strong friendships in your books. Something Like Normal is a love letter to Travis’ fallen best friend, Charlie and Kat in WTSS lets Callie be a regular teen for the first time basically ever. How different is it to write a deep friendship than a romantic relationship?


I think it’s harder to write friendship because those are the people who love us even when we’re terrible to them. That’s not to say romantic relationships don’t reach that point—my husband can vouch for that—but I think in literature we’re often focused on the falling, rather than what happens after. But with deep friendships, we see the ugly underside as well as the love.


One of the things that I love about both of your books is that many of the characters do not follow a traditional educational path after high school. Callie’s working on her GED, Alex is working on his father’s sponge boat and, of course, Travis in Something like Normal joins the Marines. Was it important to you to show that life after high school doesn’t necessarily mean a four year degree?


It’s something that became important, I think, as I realized that most of my characters (including Cadie, who you’ll meet in The Devil You Know) weren’t choosing college. There are alternate paths and you can have a fulfilled and successful life without a four year degree.


Redemption here is not a guarantee. Even the parents in these books are not necessarily going to do the right thing. It’s still pretty rare in YA for the parents to play any major role but in both these books the parents are struggling as much as the protagonists. Did Travis’ and Callie’s parents always play such large roles in their arcs?


In Where the Stars Still Shine, I always knew Callie’s dad, Greg, was going to be a big part of her story. She’d spent a lifetime away from him and I wanted to explore what it would be like to suddenly have a caring, engaged parent. What I didn’t know was that Callie’s mom would be part of the story. I envisioned her off-screen, until I realized that all of these fragile connections Callie had made with her father, Kat, Alex, and her grandmother, could potentially be undone if her mother showed up, I let it happen…just to see how Callie would handle it.


Something Like Normalwas a little trickier because I didn’t imagine Travis’ family falling apart in his absence. But once I saw how his mom was struggling to find her identity independent of her husband and sons, I knew there was potential for her and Travis to become the loving, supportive family she always wanted. In the end, I really love how their relationship grew.


The fact that your stories do not wrap up in neat packages is very refreshing. We know the path that the characters are on, but not their ultimate destinations. Do you know what’s going to happen to them after the book closes? Have you thought at all about revisiting either of them later in their stories?


I sometimes joke that “hopefully ever after endings” have become my authorial thing, but life doesn’t always give us a big red bow, so I don’t feel like my stories need them, either. I have an idea of what happens to my characters after I’ve written the final chapter, but I don’t know that I want to revisit them. I’ve left them in places where the reader gets to decide. 



You have a definite knack for dialogue. Travis and his friends sound very much like dudes I remember from high school, cracking “your mom” jokes and finding the most ridiculous ways to put each other down. Also, Callie has the most realistically awkward first date I’ve read in a while. Do you spend any time listening to real teens to get this stuff so spot on?


The relationship between Travis and his friends was pretty heavily inspired by my son and his friends. And some of the characters are loosely based on the boys that spent time hanging out in my backyard. Since I’ve been listening to them for years, it was ridiculously easy to write Travis and his high school friends and even the Marines. Also, my day job is at a bookstore, so I do pay attention to what teenagers are saying and how they’re saying it. 


You use Tumblr and Pinterest as inspiration boards so I’m guessing you’re a pretty visual person. Have you thought at all about who you’d like to cast in movie versions of your books? (We’d love to see them on the big screen!)



I am hopeless at casting by books because I do not have a wide knowledge of actors and actresses in that age range. So what I was thinking is…let’s have your readers cast the movie versions of one (or both) of my books. Anyone who participates will be entered in a drawing to win their personalized choice of my books . (reblog with your ideas by October 10 to enter)



We have to wait until June for your next book, but we are already curious! Can you tell us a little bit about The Devil You Know?



The Devil You Know is about Arcadia “Cadie” Wells, a small town Florida girl who has been loaded with responsibility since her mother died. She’s recently graduated high school and is yearning for adventure, but she’s also working, raising her little brother, and trying to keep her grieving father afloat. On a rare night out, Cadie goes to a party at the local state park where she meets Noah and Matt MacNeal, cousins who are camping their way through Florida. When they invite Cadie to join them, she jumps at the chance. But when things go tragically wrong, Cadie just might not make it home alive.


Devil is a psychological thriller, but it’s also social commentary on how difficult it is to be a girl in today’s world. 


What has been the best part about being a YA author, so far?


Fan letters. There is nothing—I mean nothing—better than getting an email from someone who connected with your book.  


Do you read YA yourself? Do you have any favorite authors to recommend to our readers?


I do read YA! Some of my favorite authors are Melina Marchetta, Suzanne Young, Steve Brezenoff, Kirsten Hubbard, and Kirstin Cronn-Mills. 


Do you have a favorite place to write?


I have a desk, but I always seem to write while sitting in the same spot on my living room couch. But we recently bought a boat, so I’m hoping that will be my new favorite place.


Do you have any advice for teens who want to pursue writing as a career?


I think my best advice is read widely. Read out of your comfort zone. Read books you don’t think you’ll like because you might be surprised. Read the boring books your teachers assign because there are lessons to be learned about writing in boring books, too . And keep writing. I don’t necessarily agree with people who think teenagers shouldn’t try to get published, but I do think that as your life experiences accumulate and your vocabulary grows, your skills as a writer (usually) improves. So focus on the writing and when you’re ready to try to be published, you’ll know. 

We are so thrilled to bring you an interview with Trish Doller, the amazing author of Something Like Normal and Where the Stars Still Shine. Check out our behind the scenes look and then go check out those books!

Your two books have very different narrators both with distinct voices. One is a Marine, just barely off the plane home and one is a ferociously independent teen girl dealing with major changes in who she considers family.  How did you decide on those voices? Was it easier to get in Callie’s or Travis’ head?

Something Like Normal was initially meant to be from the perspective of a girl like Harper, who had been wronged by Travis and spent most of her high school years as an outcast. Travis was supposed to come home from war damaged and understanding how it feels to be an outcast. Except I realized his story was far more compelling, so I let him tell it. 

In Where the StarsStill Shine, I knew Callie’s story would take place in Tarpon Springs—that was the first piece of the story—and I knew she would be returning to a family she didn’t remember, but it took some listening before I figured out that her mother had abducted her.

Callie’s character keeps so much to herself, and I found that it took me a lot more work to get to the heart of her story. Travis, on the other hand, was very forthcoming and it was much easier to be in his head.

image

There is a very strong family and community in WTSSS. Callie’s dad’s family is Greek and comes from a town where everyone knows everything about each other. Was it fun to write a big family? Are you from one?

Callie’s big fat Greek family is probably my favorite part of her story. I love writing little kids and old people and parents, so it was incredibly fun writing all of them. When I was growing up, my immediate family was just my mom and me, but I have 19 cousins with whom I spent so much time that it was like being part of a big family. And I drew a lot on the family reunion experience because I think no matter what your ethnicity, every family has bossy old ladies, gossips, and at least one aunt who leaves angry, taking her Tupperware with her.

There are some seriously strong friendships in your books. Something Like Normal is a love letter to Travis’ fallen best friend, Charlie and Kat in WTSS lets Callie be a regular teen for the first time basically ever. How different is it to write a deep friendship than a romantic relationship?

I think it’s harder to write friendship because those are the people who love us even when we’re terrible to them. That’s not to say romantic relationships don’t reach that point—my husband can vouch for that—but I think in literature we’re often focused on the falling, rather than what happens after. But with deep friendships, we see the ugly underside as well as the love.

One of the things that I love about both of your books is that many of the characters do not follow a traditional educational path after high school. Callie’s working on her GED, Alex is working on his father’s sponge boat and, of course, Travis in Something like Normal joins the Marines. Was it important to you to show that life after high school doesn’t necessarily mean a four year degree?

It’s something that became important, I think, as I realized that most of my characters (including Cadie, who you’ll meet in The Devil You Know) weren’t choosing college. There are alternate paths and you can have a fulfilled and successful life without a four year degree.

Redemption here is not a guarantee. Even the parents in these books are not necessarily going to do the right thing. It’s still pretty rare in YA for the parents to play any major role but in both these books the parents are struggling as much as the protagonists. Did Travis’ and Callie’s parents always play such large roles in their arcs?

In Where the Stars Still Shine, I always knew Callie’s dad, Greg, was going to be a big part of her story. She’d spent a lifetime away from him and I wanted to explore what it would be like to suddenly have a caring, engaged parent. What I didn’t know was that Callie’s mom would be part of the story. I envisioned her off-screen, until I realized that all of these fragile connections Callie had made with her father, Kat, Alex, and her grandmother, could potentially be undone if her mother showed up, I let it happen…just to see how Callie would handle it.

Something Like Normalwas a little trickier because I didn’t imagine Travis’ family falling apart in his absence. But once I saw how his mom was struggling to find her identity independent of her husband and sons, I knew there was potential for her and Travis to become the loving, supportive family she always wanted. In the end, I really love how their relationship grew.

The fact that your stories do not wrap up in neat packages is very refreshing. We know the path that the characters are on, but not their ultimate destinations. Do you know what’s going to happen to them after the book closes? Have you thought at all about revisiting either of them later in their stories?

I sometimes joke that “hopefully ever after endings” have become my authorial thing, but life doesn’t always give us a big red bow, so I don’t feel like my stories need them, either. I have an idea of what happens to my characters after I’ve written the final chapter, but I don’t know that I want to revisit them. I’ve left them in places where the reader gets to decide. 

image

You have a definite knack for dialogue. Travis and his friends sound very much like dudes I remember from high school, cracking “your mom” jokes and finding the most ridiculous ways to put each other down. Also, Callie has the most realistically awkward first date I’ve read in a while. Do you spend any time listening to real teens to get this stuff so spot on?

The relationship between Travis and his friends was pretty heavily inspired by my son and his friends. And some of the characters are loosely based on the boys that spent time hanging out in my backyard. Since I’ve been listening to them for years, it was ridiculously easy to write Travis and his high school friends and even the Marines. Also, my day job is at a bookstore, so I do pay attention to what teenagers are saying and how they’re saying it. 

You use Tumblr and Pinterest as inspiration boards so I’m guessing you’re a pretty visual person. Have you thought at all about who you’d like to cast in movie versions of your books? (We’d love to see them on the big screen!)

I am hopeless at casting by books because I do not have a wide knowledge of actors and actresses in that age range. So what I was thinking is…let’s have your readers cast the movie versions of one (or both) of my books. Anyone who participates will be entered in a drawing to win their personalized choice of my books . (reblog with your ideas by October 10 to enter)

We have to wait until June for your next book, but we are already curious! Can you tell us a little bit about The Devil You Know?

image

The Devil You Know is about Arcadia “Cadie” Wells, a small town Florida girl who has been loaded with responsibility since her mother died. She’s recently graduated high school and is yearning for adventure, but she’s also working, raising her little brother, and trying to keep her grieving father afloat. On a rare night out, Cadie goes to a party at the local state park where she meets Noah and Matt MacNeal, cousins who are camping their way through Florida. When they invite Cadie to join them, she jumps at the chance. But when things go tragically wrong, Cadie just might not make it home alive.

Devil is a psychological thriller, but it’s also social commentary on how difficult it is to be a girl in today’s world. 

What has been the best part about being a YA author, so far?

Fan letters. There is nothing—I mean nothing—better than getting an email from someone who connected with your book.  

Do you read YA yourself? Do you have any favorite authors to recommend to our readers?

I do read YA! Some of my favorite authors are Melina Marchetta, Suzanne Young, Steve Brezenoff, Kirsten Hubbard, and Kirstin Cronn-Mills

Do you have a favorite place to write?

I have a desk, but I always seem to write while sitting in the same spot on my living room couch. But we recently bought a boat, so I’m hoping that will be my new favorite place.

Do you have any advice for teens who want to pursue writing as a career?

I think my best advice is read widely. Read out of your comfort zone. Read books you don’t think you’ll like because you might be surprised. Read the boring books your teachers assign because there are lessons to be learned about writing in boring books, too . And keep writing. I don’t necessarily agree with people who think teenagers shouldn’t try to get published, but I do think that as your life experiences accumulate and your vocabulary grows, your skills as a writer (usually) improves. So focus on the writing and when you’re ready to try to be published, you’ll know. 

He looked like living summer.
Where the stars still shine (via lie-to-me-again-babe)
To get ready for Friday’s Interview, we’re bringing you a week of posts dedicated to Trish Doller’s Books! Today is all about girl power:    
Tegan and Sara- “Shock to Your System” Tegan and Sara are such a strong, fantastic girl duo. They’re sisters, amazing song writers and they put on one seriously awesome concert. I love how powerful their music is while still really making you want to dance. “Shock to your system” is the perfect thing to put on when you have to power through something and you need the extra push.

Where the Stars Still Shine by Trish Doller  (see our full review) Tegan and Sara need to be paired with a worthy girl narrator and Callie is up to the task. She’s been reliant on only herself for as long as she can remember. The shock to her system is that the father who she’s grown up thinking abandoned her has actually never stopped looking for her. Now she’s dropped into a family she doesn’t know in a town she doesn’t know. If there’s ever been someone who needed a song to turn up to eleven to help her keep on keeping on, it’s Callie. That refrain, “what you are is lonely” would hit really close to her heart. The challenge she faces in Where the Stars Still Shine is whether or not she can open her heart to let anyone else, when she’s learned to keep up her defenses at all times. 

To get ready for Friday’s Interview, we’re bringing you a week of posts dedicated to Trish Doller’s Books!

Today is all about girl power:

Tegan and Sara- “Shock to Your System”

Tegan and Sara are such a strong, fantastic girl duo. They’re sisters, amazing song writers and they put on one seriously awesome concert. I love how powerful their music is while still really making you want to dance. “Shock to your system” is the perfect thing to put on when you have to power through something and you need the extra push.

image

Where the Stars Still Shine by Trish Doller  (see our full review)
Tegan and Sara need to be paired with a worthy girl narrator and Callie is up to the task. She’s been reliant on only herself for as long as she can remember. The shock to her system is that the father who she’s grown up thinking abandoned her has actually never stopped looking for her.

Now she’s dropped into a family she doesn’t know in a town she doesn’t know. If there’s ever been someone who needed a song to turn up to eleven to help her keep on keeping on, it’s Callie.

That refrain, “what you are is lonely” would hit really close to her heart. The challenge she faces in Where the Stars Still Shine is whether or not she can open her heart to let anyone else, when she’s learned to keep up her defenses at all times. 

ofliterarynature:

MAGNUS CHASE and the GODS of ASGARD
THE NORSE SERIES HAS A NAME, GUYS! 

Did you guys know this already?????

ofliterarynature:

MAGNUS CHASE and the GODS of ASGARD

THE NORSE SERIES HAS A NAME, GUYS! 

Did you guys know this already?????

To get ready for Friday’s Interview, we’re bringing you a week of posts dedicated to Trish Doller’s Books! 

Something Like Normal by Trish Doller

Travis is back at the house he grew up at. But home still feels a couple thousand miles away in Afghanistan. His bed is too soft and the entire house is too quiet.

Travis didn’t sign up for the Marines because of September 11, he was only 9 when that happened. It was an option that didn’t give his dad any control over his life, and that was exactly what he was looking for. Back at home on leave for a month he’d much rather have to answer to a sergeant than his former pro-football player dad.

Because this book has kissing on the cover, there is a big chance that I have already lost the boys out there. WAIT, come back! The author says, there’s kissing in the book, but it’s mostly about Marines and that is 100% true. It’s about the way that Travis can’t relate to his  dad or even his brother the way he can with the total strangers he served with. Those guys are now more family to him than any of the men with whom he shares DNA. This is a book about the brothers you choose. It’s very different from the other military YA I’ve read because it’s not about what/whom Travis left behind, but what he found when he came back.

I figured you might not listen to me, the girl librarian who reads a lot of romances, so I have enlisted my go-to-defense-analyst to give a guy perspective on this book.


First, as a researcher myself, I was pleased that the author really did her homework. She acknowledges the assistance of a Marine unit and soldiers that she spoke with (you can read a little bit more about that here), so you know the military stuff is pretty true to life as she dug into the experiences of real Marines.

I found Travis easy to relate to and his experience rang true to me. He struggles with post-traumatic stress disorder (including a scene in a doctor’s office, which brilliantly captures the challenges soldiers and Marines face in dealing with this condition).

He no longer relates to the friends he left behind, even as he pursues a girl from his past. At the same time, he has to deal with the aftermath of the death of his best friend Charlie, including meeting Charlie’s unique mother and facing a funeral.  It’s a great story, with great characters and well worth a read!


So, there you have it, don’t let kissing on the cover scare you away from meeting Travis and reading Something Like Normal or you will seriously miss out. 

arlingtonvalib:

If you missed out on getting your #BannedBooksWeek mugshot taken last year, we’ve brought the green screen back! Get your photo taken tonight before #RainbowRowell, or take your own photo at Central Library (across from the auditorium) this week and email it to us.

Tonight!!

arlingtonvalib:

If you missed out on getting your #BannedBooksWeek mugshot taken last year, we’ve brought the green screen back! Get your photo taken tonight before #RainbowRowell, or take your own photo at Central Library (across from the auditorium) this week and email it to us.

Tonight!!

We are so excited for this week, Trish Doller is one of our very favorites and she will be doing an interview on our blog on Friday! To get ready, we’ll have a whole series of posts dedicated to her books

Where the Stars Still Shine by Trish Doller


Callie’s life has been anything but stable for as long as she can remember. Her mother moves them from place to place without much warning and with even less explanation. But, it turns out that her mother has also been running the law, Callie’s father and a large family who has been missing Callie since her mother took off with her when she was a baby.

In the space of one evening, Callie’s picked up and dropped into the life she didn’t know she’s been missing. But she doesn’t feel like she fits here either, where everyone knows everyone and they all have an idea already about who Callie is. Will she be able to become the version of Callie that her cousin Kat is already ready to be best friends with? Can she become a girl who can look forward to what a relationship with Alex, the sponge collecting, smoldering guy she keeps running into, might bring; or, is she doomed to be the Callie who just remembers all the terrible ways she’s been hurt in the past. Is there a way to be all of those Callies at once?

Trish Doller’s Something Like Normal was one of my favorite books of last year (you can see my review here). What sets Doller aside is her amazing ability to write characters who are so nuanced that they jump off the page. Callie is tough, she’s used to relying on herself and no one else, but underneath the hard veneer she’s vulnerable and even excited about the chance to try new things. Then there’s Alex, the guy that everyone in his life writes off for using his good looks to his advantage and who can’t get anyone to notice that he might have grown up since they last looked. This book is set in Florida in a Greek community and another thing that Doller shines at is easily building all sorts of relationships between her characters. The love between Callie’s grandmother and her sister is plain to see as is the unease that Callie’s new stepmother feels at suddenly having a strange teenage girl under her roof. It’s all there, just like it would be in real life and that makes it all the more affecting and real.

I also liked that this story existed outside of the bounds of high school. Callie’s mother never put her in regular school, so now at close to 18 she decides to just work towards her GED. Callie is a character who we don’t often get to meet in YA. But if your a fan of realistic fiction that you can sink your teeth into, you’re going to be glad you got the chance to spend a few hundred pages with her.

Also, this is definitely a stand alone, but I can’t be the only one who wouldn’t mind reading a  book devoted to Alex’s life on the Sponge collecting boat.

Librarian M has a review of one of our most anticipated books of the fall!
Glory O’Brien’s History of the Future by A.S. King Release Date:  October 14, 2014

Glory O’Brien is about to graduate high school when she and her best friend from the commune across the street drink a bat, which causes her to be able to see people’s pasts and futures just by looking at them. Suddenly, the girl with no plans knows what is going to happen for decades to come.

Glory is stuck pretty fiercely in the present. She and her father have never properly dealt with her mother’s suicide, and she doesn’t seem to have put much thought into what to do after high school. Her new power is just the jolt she needs to reevaluate her relationships (including her relationship with her mother) and make a plan for going forward.

Glory is a thoughtful main character and her ability to see into the future allows King to weave in some political commentary along with Glory’s personal journey. I know this sounds like a very weird premise, but if you trust King to pull it off I think you will be pleasantly surprised.More
 Teen Review: Ask the Passengers
Up and Coming: Ask the Passengers by A.S. King
 Last Minute Reviews! Please Ignore Vera Dietz by A.S. King
 

Librarian M has a review of one of our most anticipated books of the fall!

Glory O’Brien’s History of the Future by A.S. King

Release Date:  October 14, 2014
Glory O’Brien is about to graduate high school when she and her best friend from the commune across the street drink a bat, which causes her to be able to see people’s pasts and futures just by looking at them. Suddenly, the girl with no plans knows what is going to happen for decades to come.
Glory is stuck pretty fiercely in the present. She and her father have never properly dealt with her mother’s suicide, and she doesn’t seem to have put much thought into what to do after high school. Her new power is just the jolt she needs to reevaluate her relationships (including her relationship with her mother) and make a plan for going forward.
Glory is a thoughtful main character and her ability to see into the future allows King to weave in some political commentary along with Glory’s personal journey. I know this sounds like a very weird premise, but if you trust King to pull it off I think you will be pleasantly surprised.

More

 Teen Review: Ask the Passengers

Up and Coming: Ask the Passengers by A.S. King

 Last Minute Reviews! Please Ignore Vera Dietz by A.S. King

 

katiemariefunk:

meaghan:

The finished sign for Banned Books Week at dcpubliclibrary

Well done, DC. This is amazing.

 Hey, dcpubliclibrary this is awesome! Yay Banned Books Week!

katiemariefunk:

meaghan:

The finished sign for Banned Books Week at dcpubliclibrary

Well done, DC. This is amazing.

 Hey, dcpubliclibrary this is awesome! Yay Banned Books Week!

Next week:  It’s trishdoller Week on our feed! We’re pretty excited!

novateenbookfestival:

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Jessica Khoury is of Syrian and Scottish descent and was born in Toccoa, Georgia. Besides writing, Jess enjoys playing, coaching, and watching soccer and is an avid FC Barcelona fan. She’s the author of Origin, Vitro and her new novel, Kalahari. 

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About KALAHARI:

When an educational safari goes wrong, five teens find themselves stranded in the Kalahari Desert without a guide. It’s up to Sarah, the daughter of zoologists, to keep them alive and lead them to safety, calling on survival know-how from years of growing up in remote and exotic locales. Battling dehydration, starvation and the pangs of first love, she does her best to hold it together, even as their circumstances grow increasingly desperate.

But soon a terrifying encounter makes Sarah question everything she’s ever known about the natural world. A silver lion, as though made of mercury, makes a vicious, unprovoked attack on the group. After a narrow escape, they uncover the chilling truth behind the lion’s silver sheen: a highly contagious and deadly virus that threatens to ravage the entire area—and eliminate life as they know it.

Follow novateenbookfestival because we’re releasing some of the authors who will be with us on MARCH 07 at the second annual book festival!!!