That is one Friday Reads Pile we can get behind!

That is one Friday Reads Pile we can get behind!

Love is the Drug by Alaya Dawn Johnson

thisisteen:

imageimage

Emily Bird was raised not to ask questions. She has perfect hair, the perfect boyfriend, and a perfect Ivy-League future. But a chance meeting with Roosevelt David, a homeland security agent, at a party for Washington DC’s elite leads to Bird waking up in a hospital, days later, with no memory of the end of the night.

Meanwhile, the world has fallen apart: A deadly flu virus is sweeping the nation, forcing quarantines, curfews, even martial law. And Roosevelt is certain that Bird knows something. Something about the virus—something about her parents’ top secret scientific work—something she shouldn’t know.

The only one Bird can trust is Coffee, a quiet, outsider genius who deals drugs to their classmates and is a firm believer in conspiracy theories. And he believes in Bird. But as Bird and Coffee dig deeper into what really happened that night, Bird finds that she might know more than she remembers. And what she knows could unleash the biggest government scandal in US history.

Read an excerpt: 
(to view in full-screen, click the button in the bottom right-hand corner of the excerpt)

Get the book:

Amazon      Barnes & Noble      Books-a-Million      Google Play

Hastings      iBookstore      Indie Bound      Walmart

Read more about The Summer Prince, also by Alaya Dawn Johnson, here!

This one’s set in DC and we want to read it soooo badly!

rainbowrowell:

naturallysteph:

Hurrah! My True Love Gave to Me has received a *STARRED REVIEW* from Kirkus Reviews:
"Rich language and careful, efficient character development make the collection an absorbing and sophisticated read, each story surprisingly fresh despite the constraints of a shared theme. It’s that rarest of short story collections: There’s not a single lump of coal."
• Featuring stories by: Holly Black, Ally Carter, Matt de la Peña, Gayle Forman, Jenny Han, David Levithan, Kelly Link, Myra McEntire, Stephanie Perkins, Rainbow Rowell, Laini Taylor, and Kiersten White.
• Mark it to-read on Goodreads here.
• Pre-order it on Barnes & Noble here or on Amazon here.

Hooray! I have a story in this collection called “Midnights” that takes place over four New Year’s Eves. It’s all very romantic. 

We can’t even wait!

rainbowrowell:

naturallysteph:

Hurrah! My True Love Gave to Me has received a *STARRED REVIEW* from Kirkus Reviews:

"Rich language and careful, efficient character development make the collection an absorbing and sophisticated read, each story surprisingly fresh despite the constraints of a shared theme. It’s that rarest of short story collections: There’s not a single lump of coal."

• Featuring stories by: Holly Black, Ally Carter, Matt de la Peña, Gayle Forman, Jenny Han, David Levithan, Kelly Link, Myra McEntire, Stephanie Perkins, Rainbow Rowell, Laini Taylor, and Kiersten White.

• Mark it to-read on Goodreads here.

• Pre-order it on Barnes & Noble here or on Amazon here.

Hooray! I have a story in this collection called “Midnights” that takes place over four New Year’s Eves. It’s all very romantic. 

We can’t even wait!

wearetatal:

We are already missing our fabulous teen reviewer, Mira, while she’s on a semester abroad, but we’re glad she’s still sending us reviews! Today, she takes us back, to the last decade of the last millennium…. 
Ahhh…the 90s. Scrunchies. Dawson’s Creek. Big phones. As someone born in the late 90s, I learned all my historically accurate 90’s culture through Clueless. As many people do. For my 90’s historical fiction book I picked Way To Go by the wonderful Tom Ryan. I believe this is his debut book. Let’s do this! 
Way To Go is about a teenager named Danny who lives in a small town in Nova Scotia, Canada. His friends are totally opposite ends of the spectrum, and he kind of just floats in the middle. He also is gay, which everyone suspects but he doesn’t want to believe. After he gets a summer job and befriends a new girl working with him, he tries to prove to everyone that he’s straight. 
I don’t want to say too much else about the plot of the book, as it’s relatively short. It was a very easy read, I think I finished it in a couple hours. I loved the message of acceptance in this book, specifically of self acceptance. I think that’s something that is very hard for a lot of people, especially teens who are still trying to figure out who they are and where they fit in the world. The dialogue in the book made it more relatable, and the characters were extremely accessible. I almost wish the book was longer because the characters were so much fun to read. One of the best characters in the book is Danny’s younger sister, Alma. She is hilarious, constantly quoting movies and lightening the mood. Younger siblings are the best. 
For anyone looking for a short, summer read with strong characters and a moving plot, I would highly recommend this book. It’s too hot outside to not visit the air-conditioned library every week! 

wearetatal:

This is still one of our favorite lit spotlights. Take a trip back in time with us: 

As you can probably tell by the fact that we over use the words “totally” and “awesome” all the time, many of the writers of this blog are children of the 90s. So, it’s a little crazy to us that there’s been a big demand for stuff that was popular between 1990-1999, here at the library among teens…ummm… crazy awesome that is.

If you’re looking for a primer to all that was rad in the last decade of the last century, here’s a guide to some of the stuff you’ll find at the library.

image

 My So Called Life
If you really want to time travel back to the nineties than you need look no further than this DVD set. The fashion, the music, the angst, it doesn’t get much better than this.

Claire Danes is Angela Chase, a high school student who breaks out of her routine and starts hanging out with a few outsider friends. The only thing wrong with this show is that there’s only one season of it.

Lois Duncan Horror Novels

image

Do you need some 90s chills and thrills? Lois Duncan is the author for you. Many of her books were turned into movies in the 90s and she was one of the go to people for freaking yourself out when you were home alone. Her books have all been re-released so you can scare yourself silly, but with a retro flair.

image

Clueless
Things we say today came from this movie. Most famously, “As If!” The over-the-top fashions in this movie are 90s eye candy. Also if your class has to read Emma, this should get you some extra credit, because the plot is based on the classic. Now it’s a teen classic all it’s own and Cher would be thrilled to see that some of her fashion is trendy again.


10 Things I Hate About You
Here’s another one to help in English class. This is a very 90s take on Shakespeare’s The Taming of the Shrew. Kat’s younger sister can’t date until she does, so the boys who are desperate to take out the lovely Miss Bianca must find someone daring (or crazy) enough to want to risk a date with Kat.

Did you see Prom last spring? This was first! And don’t miss out a very young Heath Ledger singing his heart out while running across some bleachers…


pictures from linked wikipedia pages.

Did you know that Scott Westerfeld has a new book coming out this fall? Librarian M has the details to get you ready!
Afterworlds by Scott WesterfeldRelease Date: September 23, 2014

You may be asking yourself: “Why is Scott Westerfeld’s new book 600 pages long?” Well, it is actually two books in one! They alternate chapters, and if you think that sounds like a disaster, let me assure you that you are wrong. It actually works out really well.

The first book is about Darcy Patel. She is only 18 years old but she has won the publishing lottery: the novel that she wrote during NaNoWriMo (National Novel Writing Month for those of you now in the know) was picked up by a major publisher for a rather large sum of money. Clearly, the only course of action for her to take is to ditch out on college and move to New York so she can soak in all those writerly vibes for her sequel. Of course, first she has to get through all those rewrites….

The second book is Darcy’s novel. It’s about a girl named Lizzie who survives a terrorist attack and in the process is touched by death and finds herself with access to the afterworld. Now she can see ghosts (of people, animals, buildings, etc.) and other psychopomps such as herself. Her problems multiply as she gets romantically involved with another psychopomp, learns that the ghost of her mother’s murdered childhood friend lives with them, and tries to stay away from a creepy old psychopomp trying to extract favors from her.

While Lizzie’s new powers are fairly straightforward, Darcy also has new powers. She suddenly has access to lots of money and independence and reading about how she deals with it is a real treat. If you want to read either a book about a teen in the NYC publishing world OR a teen who travels to the afterworld I recommend you pick this one up. Both stories are great and are great together!

Did you know that Scott Westerfeld has a new book coming out this fall? Librarian M has the details to get you ready!

Afterworlds by Scott Westerfeld

Release Date: September 23, 2014
You may be asking yourself: “Why is Scott Westerfeld’s new book 600 pages long?” Well, it is actually two books in one! They alternate chapters, and if you think that sounds like a disaster, let me assure you that you are wrong. It actually works out really well.
The first book is about Darcy Patel. She is only 18 years old but she has won the publishing lottery: the novel that she wrote during NaNoWriMo (National Novel Writing Month for those of you now in the know) was picked up by a major publisher for a rather large sum of money. Clearly, the only course of action for her to take is to ditch out on college and move to New York so she can soak in all those writerly vibes for her sequel. Of course, first she has to get through all those rewrites….
The second book is Darcy’s novel. It’s about a girl named Lizzie who survives a terrorist attack and in the process is touched by death and finds herself with access to the afterworld. Now she can see ghosts (of people, animals, buildings, etc.) and other psychopomps such as herself. Her problems multiply as she gets romantically involved with another psychopomp, learns that the ghost of her mother’s murdered childhood friend lives with them, and tries to stay away from a creepy old psychopomp trying to extract favors from her.
While Lizzie’s new powers are fairly straightforward, Darcy also has new powers. She suddenly has access to lots of money and independence and reading about how she deals with it is a real treat. If you want to read either a book about a teen in the NYC publishing world OR a teen who travels to the afterworld I recommend you pick this one up. Both stories are great and are great together!

TOP 5: BACK TO SCHOOL BOOKS

(reblogged from 08/16/11)

Although we want to pretend it’s not the case, summer is ticking down. Now that the County Fair is over, we thought it was safe to present you with this list of top 5 books for going back to school. We thought the best way to truly get into the back to school mindset was with 5 books about starting somewhere new.

Looking for Alaska  by John Green (more from the blog on this book here)
Miles has never had much luck with other teens his own age. When he has the chance to start over at boarding school he has new adventures, new crushes, new best friends and even a new nickname for his extremely skinny self: Pudge.

What Happened to Goodbye by Sarah Dessen (see more from the blog here)
McLean is an old hand at starting new schools, but every time she likes to be someone else. This time, however, things aren’t going according to plan and she ends up starting the first day as herself. But putting herself out there means there’s so much more to lose if she and her dad have to leave once more.

Happyface by Stephen Emond (see more from the blog here)
Happyface is starting over because he needs to leave his past behind. So with his drawings and his journal to help him, he’s doing his best not to look back. But what happens if the things he wants to forget just won’t leave him alone? Don’t call Happyface a Wimpy-Kid read-alike.

Anna and the French Kiss  by Stephanie Perkins (see more from the blog here)
Is there any worse time to start a new school than the beginning of your senior year? Anna doesn’t think so. Also she is not feeling better just because that school happens to be in France—- it just means she’s an ocean away from everything she loves: her mom, her little brother, her best friend and her coworker/maybe boyfriend. But the City of Lights is pretty hard to resist and so are the students at the American School where Anna will be attending and this may turn out to be a year that she’ll never forget.

Sleeping Freshmen Never Lie by David Lubar
Ah the life of a freshman. The stuck combination locks. The upper classmen bullies. The homework. The girls who don’t look at you. This is the life of Scott Hudson our faithful narrator. Join him as he navigates the hallways, joins the school play and tries to find his place in the brand new world of high school.

Guardians of the Galaxy Read-Alikes

metrolibrary:

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Seen the movie and can’t get enough Guardians of the Galaxy? Try these books and comics with similar humor, action, and outer-space hijinks.

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You can’t talk about space outlaws without mentioning Firefly, right? This book celebrates the cult status of the short-lived TV show with new…

Librarian M has the scoop on the latest by one of our most popular graphic novelists (of all time, forever and ever):
Sisters by Raina Telgemeier
Raina Telgemeier has a new book out! Raina Telgemeier has a new book out!
Sisters is a companion book to Smile, but you don’t need to have read Smile to enjoy Sisters. (But really, you should Smile, too, because it is also great.) This story chronicles a road trip that Raina’s family takes from San Francisco to Colorado. Raina and her sister Amara have never been simpatico, but being trapped in the car together taxes their already strained relationship. Can two sisters who have nothing in common ever get along?
This book is very insightful about family dynamics and realistically portrays a family weathering different kinds of hardships. It’s also very funny and you’ll probably want to read it all in one sitting. Get yourself to library catalog to place your hold now!
theartofyoungadult:

Ronan Lynch and Chainsaw, here to brighten your Monday

theartofyoungadult:

Ronan Lynch and Chainsaw, here to brighten your Monday

He was contemplation and enthusiasm. Ambition and strong coffee.
E. Lockhart, We Were Liars (via wordsnquotes)

This is still one of our favorite lit spotlights. Take a trip back in time with us: 

As you can probably tell by the fact that we over use the words “totally” and “awesome” all the time, many of the writers of this blog are children of the 90s. So, it’s a little crazy to us that there’s been a big demand for stuff that was popular between 1990-1999, here at the library among teens…ummm… crazy awesome that is.

If you’re looking for a primer to all that was rad in the last decade of the last century, here’s a guide to some of the stuff you’ll find at the library.

image

 My So Called Life
If you really want to time travel back to the nineties than you need look no further than this DVD set. The fashion, the music, the angst, it doesn’t get much better than this.

Claire Danes is Angela Chase, a high school student who breaks out of her routine and starts hanging out with a few outsider friends. The only thing wrong with this show is that there’s only one season of it.

Lois Duncan Horror Novels

image

Do you need some 90s chills and thrills? Lois Duncan is the author for you. Many of her books were turned into movies in the 90s and she was one of the go to people for freaking yourself out when you were home alone. Her books have all been re-released so you can scare yourself silly, but with a retro flair.

image

Clueless
Things we say today came from this movie. Most famously, “As If!” The over-the-top fashions in this movie are 90s eye candy. Also if your class has to read Emma, this should get you some extra credit, because the plot is based on the classic. Now it’s a teen classic all it’s own and Cher would be thrilled to see that some of her fashion is trendy again.


10 Things I Hate About You
Here’s another one to help in English class. This is a very 90s take on Shakespeare’s The Taming of the Shrew. Kat’s younger sister can’t date until she does, so the boys who are desperate to take out the lovely Miss Bianca must find someone daring (or crazy) enough to want to risk a date with Kat.

Did you see Prom last spring? This was first! And don’t miss out a very young Heath Ledger singing his heart out while running across some bleachers…


pictures from linked wikipedia pages.

We are already missing our fabulous teen reviewer, Mira, while she’s on a semester abroad, but we’re glad she’s still sending us reviews! Today, she takes us back, to the last decade of the last millennium…. 
Ahhh…the 90s. Scrunchies. Dawson’s Creek. Big phones. As someone born in the late 90s, I learned all my historically accurate 90’s culture through Clueless. As many people do. For my 90’s historical fiction book I picked Way To Go by the wonderful Tom Ryan. I believe this is his debut book. Let’s do this! 
Way To Go is about a teenager named Danny who lives in a small town in Nova Scotia, Canada. His friends are totally opposite ends of the spectrum, and he kind of just floats in the middle. He also is gay, which everyone suspects but he doesn’t want to believe. After he gets a summer job and befriends a new girl working with him, he tries to prove to everyone that he’s straight. 
I don’t want to say too much else about the plot of the book, as it’s relatively short. It was a very easy read, I think I finished it in a couple hours. I loved the message of acceptance in this book, specifically of self acceptance. I think that’s something that is very hard for a lot of people, especially teens who are still trying to figure out who they are and where they fit in the world. The dialogue in the book made it more relatable, and the characters were extremely accessible. I almost wish the book was longer because the characters were so much fun to read. One of the best characters in the book is Danny’s younger sister, Alma. She is hilarious, constantly quoting movies and lightening the mood. Younger siblings are the best. 
For anyone looking for a short, summer read with strong characters and a moving plot, I would highly recommend this book. It’s too hot outside to not visit the air-conditioned library every week! 

Katie puts on her acid-washed jeans to bring us back to the 1980s.

Want to take a trip back in time but not too far back? I give you the 1980s and all the things that come with that fascinating decade—the good, the bad, and the ridiculously awesome.
The Berlin Wall: Going Over by Beth Kephart brings 1980s Berlin alive. A Berlin that was still divided by a wall, tearing apart families, challenging the brave to escape. It is a love story, a story of survival, and a beautiful glimpses into life on both sides of the wall. I loved it. (see our full review)
Mixed Tapes: If you’ve never known the joy of a mixed tape in a walkman, find yourself a copy of Eleanor & Park ASAP. And maybe a walkman just for good measure. Rainbow Rowell has crafted a book that celebrates a decade, celebrates the power of love, embraces misfits, and boldly tackles the darker sides of family and the challenging decisions we sometimes must make for ourselves. But yeah, my favorite part is the music. (see our posts)
Thirty-Five Cent Candy Bars: This used to be a thing, guys. I’m sorry if you missed out. Candy bar inflation is one of the 21st centuries great injustices. But you can live out this dream vicariously through Dana Reinhardt’s The Summer I Learned to Fly. It’s the summer of 1986, and 13-year-old Drew Robin Solo is waiting for life to happen. That something turns out to be a someone in the form of Emmett. And this book is not just about a decade but about summer in all of its glorious possibility.
Arcade Games: Okay, so Ready Player One by Ernest Cline is the opposite of historical fiction. It’s actually set in a dystopian not-so-distant future (2044), but it belongs on this list because tucked away not-so-subtly in the plot of a young dude on a supremely nerdy cyber-quest involving virtual reality and old video games is so much 1980s pop culture trivia you might want to read it with Wikipedia close at hand. This is an incredibly fun book that somehow captures—in between the nostalgia for the past and the future it creates—some very important truths about the world we live in today. (see our reviews)
New York City: This is not the city you may have come to know from weekend trips up I-95. 1980s New York was a rawer version of what it is today (or so I’m told). And it’s that city which is explored in Jennifer Banash’s White Lines. Cat is 17-year-old “club kid”. Despite having her own apartment and plenty of money, she isn’t exactly living the fairy tale. Her coming-of-age story, which wouln’t be complete without a Ramones-loving boy, is every bit as gritty and challenging as the place and time in which it is set.

How Do I Get Started On My Book?

lauriehalseanderson:

A friend asked me this today. Here is my response:

The best advice I can give you is to get started.

Right now.

Don’t even finish reading this email. Open a Word doc or grab a piece of paper and write. When you get blocked or afraid or the stupid-critical voice pops up in your head, give the…